Halloween Safety Tips

Sutton Quantum

Halloween Safety Tips

Ghost stories and creepy costumes aside, Halloween can seem just as scary for parents as for kids. Keeping your kids safe and healthy is at the top of any parent’s mind at the best of times, but there’s no reason the spookiest night of the year should be any more hazardous! Follow our list of tips to make sure your kids have a safe and happy Halloween.

  • Try to choose costumes that are brightly-coloured so that your child will be more visible at night. Reflective tape is a great choice for darker coloured costumes, especially if your child will be riding a bike or a skateboard.

  • Make sure that any capes, cloaks, and longer costumes are short enough to avoid tripping hazards. Choose costumes that are easy to move around in (and that are bathroom friendly!)

  • If your child’s costume includes an accessory like a sword, make sure it is made of a soft, flexible material and has a dull edge.

  • Remind children to keep away from open fires and candles. Many store-bought costumes are made with Polyester, which is highly flammable.

  • Use face paint rather than masks or things that will cover the eyes. This is an opportunity to flex your creativity and make your child’s Spiderman costume stand out from the crowd with a unique design instead of a mask that everyone else has on.

  • Test makeup for itchiness or irritation on a small area of skin beforehand, and make sure your child removes all makeup before bedtime.

  • Make sure your child is dressed warmly enough for a cool October evening - even if it means partially covering their costume. If they object, tell them that incorporating a jacket into their costume is a rite of passage for Canadian trick-or-treaters! 

  • Remind children to walk, slither, and sneak on sidewalks - not on the road.

  • Make sure your child is dressed warmly enough for a cool October evening - even if it means partially covering their costume. If they object, tell them that incorporating a jacket into their costume is a rite of passage for Canadian trick-or-treaters!

  • Remind children to walk, slither, and sneak on sidewalks - not on the road.

  • Explain to children that they should visit houses along one side of the street first and then the other, and to only cross the street at intersections and crosswalks.

  • Remind children to look both ways before crossing the street and to check for cars, trucks, and low-flying brooms. Caution your child that not only children celebrate Halloween and that drivers may be more distracted than usual.

  • Provide yourself or your child with a flashlight to see better and to be more visible to others. And if they happen to like telling spooky ghost stories, a flashlight is a must-have for that too! Glow-sticks don’t give off as much light, but they can be a suitable alternative.

  • There’s no hard-and-fast rule for when you should allow your child to trick-or-treat without an adult, but many parents feel that 9-13 is an acceptable range. Use your judgement and talk to your child about what you think is best. 

  • If your child is travelling without an adult, make sure they travel in groups of four or five. Children of any age should never trick-or-treat alone.
  • Have children plan their route and share it with you and the family. You may find it helpful to walk a route with your child along your neighbourhood a night or two beforehand to see how different it is to navigate after dark.

  • Only visit homes that have the porch light on. This  a safety tip but also a courtesy - not every household will be participating in Halloween.

  • Make sure children know they should accept treats at the door and must not get into cars or enter the homes of strangers.

  • Caution your child against getting too close to neighbourhood dogs, even ones the child may know - dogs may not recognize children in costumes and may react unpredictably.

  • Remind children not to eat their treats until an adult at home has examined them. If the packaging has been opened or compromised in any way, throw that candy out. Remember that small, hard pieces of candy can be a choking hazard for young children.

  • Make sure you and your children know where theBlock Parenthouses are located in the neighborhood.

  • Set agreed-to boundaries and curfews with your children.  Explain the importance of staying within them and arriving home on time.